BODY: The Physician Within

Intermittent fasting has received increased press in recent years as a revolutionary eating schedule with amazing health benefits. While I am typically all over trying new lifestyle techniques, initially I wanted to avoid fasting because it seemed like a gateway habit for a resurgence of unhealthy eating patterns and an over-dependence on rigidity in an eating schedule. Saying that, I have been following a 16-8 eating schedule for almost a year now and admittedly I can see certain health benefits associated with intermittent fasting such as better digestion, more restful sleep, less bloating and admittedly, some weight-loss.

The concept of fasting is neither new nor revolutionary; ancient Greeks believed that medical treatment could be observed from nature and saw that humans, much like other animals, actively avoid eating while sick. During a fasting period you abstain from food or drink (or both) for health, ritualistic, religious or ethical purposes.

Paracelsus, a renowned healer, wrote over 500 years ago that, “fasting is the greatest remedy, the physician within.” Fasting is now recognized worldwide as a conduit for detoxification which allows and aids the removal of toxins in the body (thought to be responsible for illness and other conditions). By tapping into this innate power, we allow the body to heal itself. (1)

Fasting as a spiritual process is practiced by followers of: Buddhism, Christianity, Islam, Judaism, Taoism, Jainism and Hinduism. While the fasting length and intensity varies, the common belief among the religions is that it is beneficial for cleansing and purification.

Although widely practiced by different religions and for health purposes, fasts have also been used to express social and political views. Gandhi famously fasted in prison to atone for the violence of his followers against the British rule in India. Fasting has been used worldwide to protest everything from war, social injustices and civil rights violations. (2)

Intermittent fasting (IF) is an eating pattern that cycles between periods of fasting and eating. It doesn’t specify what food you can eat and instead focuses on when you can eat them; for this reason it is less of a diet and more of an eating pattern. The most popular IF schedule is a 16-hour fast with a daily eating window of eight hours, such as 1-9PM. Others practice the 5-2 method: fasting for 24 hours (or consuming 500-600 calories on two non-consecutive days of the week) but eating normally the other five days.

A common mistake in the beginning of starting an IF program is the tendency to indulge in more calories than normal during your eating window. As long as you eat within your window and eat normally, you should notice positive changes. It’s also quite easy to eat less calories than before, so your body will kick up its natural fat-burning; short-term fasting has been shown to help your metabolism increase by 3-14%. In the beginning of my 16-8 schedule I followed a 7PM-11AM fasting period; by doing this I noticed that when I got up in the morning I actually wasn’t physically hungry and I had been eating right away solely out of habit. The fasting window let me get in touch with my hunger cues and only eat when my body was expressing its need for food. After one or two weeks of sticking to my schedule I noticed that aside from some hunger pains before I went to slept, it was a fairly painless process.

While you’re in the fasting period, your body is undergoing a myriad of processes in order to make the most of this time. The Human Growth Hormone (HGH) is raised as much as 5x during this window which will have benefits for fat loss and muscle gain. Insulin levels also drop dramatically which makes stored body fat more accessible to burn away. Even your genes are affected and some studies show that they will undergo changes to help protect against disease and foster cellular repair. Studies are still being done on the full range of benefits, but it has been shown to help inflammation, heart health and increase protection against cancerous cells.

I would definitely recommend trying intermittent fasting if you are looking for something new to help you break through a plateau. Personally I use the BodyFast app to manage my fasting windows and I find it’s a great help. It took me a month or two to get into an easy rhythm and manage my nutrient intake within the fasting window and to stop having mild binges when I broke my fast. I definitely think that IF can be dangerous and a trigger for those who are suffering/recovering from an eating disorder so it is worth discussing IF with a doctor before beginning a program.

As always, just like with any major diet or lifestyle change, the IF schedule needs to be used in moderation; fasting times are made to be extended/shortened; give your body days off to go out for a late dinner or have an early breakfast. Play around with the concept of fasting and see what works best for your body on your own schedule.

Citations:
1. Hicks, C. “Why fasting is now back in fashion.” Telegraph, 13 Apr. 2015, http://www.telegraph.co.uk/lifestyle/11524808/The-history-of-fasting.html
2. The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica. “Fasting.” Britannica, 20 Jul. 1998. https://www.britannica.com/topic/fasting
3. Gunnars, Kris. “Intermittent Fasting 101 – The Ultimate Beginner’s Guide.” Healthline Media, 25 Jul. 2018, https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/intermittent-fasting-guide.

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MIND: Amazonia

Forests and meat animals compete for the same land. The prodigious appetite of the affluent nations for meat means that agribusiness can pay more than those who want to preserve or restore the forest.

We are, quite literally, gambling with the future of our planet – for the sake of hamburgers.

Animal Liberation // Peter Singer

SOL: No Siesta, No Fiesta

I’ve always been a huge fan of sleep, mainly because I feel I am always one night away from comatose-like exhaustion. I loved living in Barcelona because siestas (aka “cultured naps”) were the norm and the entire city would grind to a halt in the afternoon in order to honor this tradition. It was glorious! In researching burn-out and general life fatigue I’ve found a lot of interesting facts about the role quality sleep plays in ensuring the proper functioning of our entire body.

Before I dive into getting a good night’s sleep, it’s important to touch on our circadian rhythms and how they affect our well-being. Every day we go through physical, mental and behavioral changes in response to how dark or light our environment is; for example, a light-related circadian rhythm is the most common, where we sleep at night and are awake during the day. Our inner circadian rhythm is important because it ties heavily into our biological clocks; an internal timing device made up of proteins that interact with cells throughout our body and can be found in almost every tissue and organ. The functioning of our biological clock produces our circadian rhythm and helps to regulate the timing of our system.

The biggest influence of circadian rhythm is the amount of light we are exposed to and when we get the exposure. Daylight turns on and off genes that speed up, slow down or reset our biological clocks. The circadian rhythm affects our sleep-wake cycles, hormonal release, body temperature, eating habits and digestion. When our systems are irregular and out of whack, we are more likely to suffer from sleep disorders, diabetes, obesity and depression.

Our body’s master clock is a group of around 20,000 nerve cells that join together to form a suprachiasmatic nucleus, also referred to as SCN (science sucks, but stay with me here). SCN is located in the part of the brain called the hypothalamus and receives direct input from the eyes. The hypothalamus is located near the pituitary gland at the base of the brain and is responsible for maintaining our nervous system, hormonal releases, temperature regulation and appetite. The SCN controls the production of melatonin, our sleep hormone. When we are exposed to lower amounts of light the brain releases more melatonin, which in turn creates the feeling of drowsiness. This is one of the reasons we need exposure to adequate daylight during waking hours as it allows our SCN to regulate our sleep–awake schedule. Researches are still studying the effects of shift-work and light from our screens to see how they alter our body’s rhythms.

Have you ever taken a long flight across different time zones? Or my personal favourite, a red-eye flight with a layover or two sprinkled in-between? The resulting feeling of jet-lag is due to the travel disrupting your body’s circadian rhythm. Even if you are landing in a European time zone your body is chugging along on a North American schedule, sending your system into utter catastrophe. It is completely normal for your system to take a few days to reset itself.

I’m sure you’ve heard the old adage of “quality over quantity” before, but it applies to sleep as well. Eight hours of light or interrupted sleep doesn’t allow you to reap the same benefits of 6 hours of deep, REM & light sleep.

Not all sleep is equal, but each type of sleep serves a purpose. If your body is able to cycle through all four stages at night, you are more likely to wake up refreshed rather than fatigued and cranky. Scientists have grouped sleep into four stages: NON-REM stages 1, 2 & 3 and REM sleep. If you use a sleep tracker or FitBit, you’ll notice you have moments of wakefulness throughout the night which is completely normal. If your sleep tracker logs you as “awake” it simply means your brain wave activity is higher and your muscles are active. We wake up numerous times throughout the night but most are so minor we don’t remember it the next day.

Stage 1 is a light stage of sleep where you are easily disturbed. Muscles begin to relax and the brain starts to slow down; this stage is where most people experience “twitches” or hypnic jerks and often where you find yourself drifting in and out of sleep. Most sleep trackers don’t include this stage of sleep or it is counted as being awake.

Stage 2 is where scientists start to classify it as Non-REM sleep. On FitBit and sleep trackers, this is likely identified as your “Light Sleep Stage.” You’re less likely to be woken up by environmental factors; your body temperature begins to drop and your heart rate will slow down. Your brain waves continue to slow and are marked with sleep spindles (sudden bursts of brain activity) and sleep structures called K complexes; both are thought to protect the brain from awakening.

Stage 3 is known as deep Non-REM sleep. On Fitbit or sleep trackers it will likely be logged as simply, “deep sleep.” This is where most of the restorative properties of sleep occur; if you spend less time in this stage, you will likely be less physically, mentally and emotionally rested. Good quality deep sleep will also help with your memory and learning skills. This is likely the stage where you are “sleeping like a rock” and difficult to awaken; sleep abnormalities such as sleep walking, night terrors, and sleep talking are also the most likely to occur. In this stage the human growth hormone is released and works to restore your body after the stressors of the day. It is also when your immune system works to restore itself; another reason why you are more prone to illness when tired and stressed. There is still a lot of research that needs to be done on this stage of sleep, but many believe this is when the brain reboots and refreshes itself to prepare for another day of learning.

The fourth stage of sleep, REM, meaning rapid eye movement, is well-known as being the dreaming stage. The eyes will move from side to side and brain waves are more active than Stage 2 and 3. Breathing in this stage can become more rapid and even irregular, limb muscles become paralyzed (which may be to prevent you from acting out your dreams) and heart rate increases; sexual disturbances are also likely to occur in this stage of sleep. When you wake in the middle of an REM period you can feel groggy or fatigued; this is called sleep inertia and can last several minutes to several hours. REM has been shown to be important for memory and mood management.

Sleep cycles vary depending on the person, but typically you enter a new sleep cycle every 90-120 minutes, so over the course of a night you’ll go through four or five cycles. Often the cycles will go from light to deep sleep, then revert back to light, before ending in REM and starting the cycle all over again.
The bulk of your sleep will be in Stage 2, or light sleep, and will account for 40-60% of your total sleep on any given night. Stage 3, or deep sleep, lasts for about 5-15% of total sleep time for adults; for children and teens this stage is longer. REM can crop up at any time in the sleep cycle but on average you will find that it kicks in after 90 minutes of sleep.

The average adult should be sleeping 7-9 hours a night, but in many Western societies sleep is seen as a sign of weakness and people will brag about how little sleep they need to perform. Pulling an all-nighter to complete a task is actually more likely to negatively affect the quality of your performance. What happens after neglecting quality sleep is that we start to decline and go into sleep deprivation. While it isn’t an officially recognized sleep disorder, it occurs when we consistently sleep too little to feel rested. While it seems innocent enough, if it is a chronic issue it can have implications on our health, happiness and productivity. Some studies report that 20% of Americans are sleep-deprived and as such are more prone to accidents, diseases and missed work. The most affected groups are shift workers, healthcare workers and truck drivers. While it sounds like an easy problem to fix, if it goes untreated it can cause lasting health complications, such as Type 2 diabetes, raised stress hormones, higher risk of cardiovascular diseases, inflammation, anxiety, memory problems and weight gain.

Even if it isn’t a common occurrence, moderate sleep deprivation causes physical impairment that mirrors the effects of intoxication. After 17 to 19 hours without sleep (i.e. all-nighters, long shift work, probably accountants in NYC) the performance of several test subjects was the same as those with a BAC of 0.05 percent; for most people, this means the same as one alcoholic drink per hour. Using this logic, if you are 24 hours without sleep, you should not be behind the wheel of a car.

When you are chronically exhausted, you may be more likely to experience “microsleep” which is not as cute as it sounds. These short bursts of sleep often occur without the person being aware they are happening and are responsible for road accidents and on-job errors. I used to read on the train into work (part of my two-hour commute to my job in Toronto) and I would wake up because my neck would snap forward and jolt me awake. Does this sound familiar? It is, in fact, a period of unintended sleep due to exhaustion. If you get up pre-dawn, your body is programmed to be asleep and will be more likely to try and revert to this state, unbeknownst to you.

A 2011 study on sleep deprived rats showed that when exhausted they were more likely to lose competence during tasks involving complex motor skills; for humans, it may explain why we consistently misplace our phone or are more forgetful when we are tired. The best way to prevent instances of microsleep is to practice good sleep hygiene.

Much like a rigorous workout schedule, our sleep schedule and habits need to be monitored to ensure they encourage a high-quality night of sleep. Good sleep hygiene encompasses all the things we can do from the moment we wake up until we go to bed that will foster better sleep. There are small changes you can make, even if you work a shift schedule that consistently disrupts your circadian rhythm, to try and ensure you go through all the necessary sleep cycles.

The video below has some great tips for sleep hacking your way to a better night’s sleep, but a few highlights are:

• Getting direct sunlight exposure once you wake up to reset your body clock. All it takes is 20-30 minutes of being outside in the sun to help you fall asleep that evening.
• Turn on a “night-time light” on your phone/tablets and disconnect an hour and a half before you plan on falling asleep. The stimulation from being online can negatively impact the quality of sleep.
• Move your body first thing in the morning. Cortisol (your stress hormone) is meant to peak in the morning but an irregular sleep schedule can throw it off. By doing a five minute HIIT workout upon waking up you trigger the production of cortisol and let your body know you are starting the day.
• Spend less time in bed when you aren’t sleeping. Lounging in bed excessively lets your body know you can be in bed while not sleeping – not what you’re trying to accomplish!
• Be conscious of your diet during the day but especially in the four hours before sleep; avoid stimulants such as coffee, nicotine and alcohol as all of them will disrupt sleep pattern. Try not to indulge in a heavy meal consisting of spices, high-fat, citrus or carbonation as they are likely to trigger indigestion and disrupt sleep.
• I was told at a young age to always invest in the three things that come between you and the Earth: good shoes, good tires and a good mattress. Your sleep environment should be welcoming and comfortable; the best condition for sleep is in a dark room with a cool temperature and no noise. It sounds sterile, but investing in a white noise machine, a quality mattress and black-out curtains will change your life.

If you don’t use a sleep tracker, some easy ways to tell if your sleep is being disrupted is to monitor how you feel over the course of the day. If you wake up throughout the night (in most instances you won’t remember waking up during the night in the morning) you are more likely to experience daytime sleepiness and a persisting feeling of fatigue. If it takes you a long time to fall asleep, establishing a bed-time routine to wind-down (such as drinking tea, reading a book, or light stretching) will help your body and mind relax.

Do you have any other tips or tricks you swear by for a good night’s sleep? Let me know!

BODY: Ameliorate

It is inevitable that every time a New Year rolls around we get sucked into the marketing vortex of “New Year, New Me” and all the health supplements, workout clothes and gym memberships that are sold as the complete package of health.

I guess, “New Year, Same Lazy Piece of Shit” doesn’t have the same ring to it.

Saying that, while it is noble to implement health goals at the start of each year, more often than not we set ourselves up for disaster. More than half of people who set New Year’s goals backslide within the first month, sometimes giving up on themselves altogether. While roadblocks occur in the pursuit of any dream, I think it is crucial to stay focused on the bigger picture.

Personally, I think setting highly specific goals, while initially effective, can become the bane of your existence, especially for weight loss. Focusing steadfastly on a “goal weight” will make you more likely to cut calories (or entire food groups) and resort to over-exercising and under-eating. Less emphasis should be placed on the number and more on the quality of your health and the way your body feels. Aches, pains, inflammation and rashes are all signs that your body is off-balance and through a healthy diet and exercise you can often alleviate or even eliminate these symptoms.

As I get older and more in tune with my body, I start to realize how sensitive my system is and the importance of good nutrition. While in my early party days I was able to indulge in all manner of vices (i.e. booze, party candy, and post-party Cora’s trips) without feeling too much damage the next day. Now… A few drinks and the next morning I can feel my body running at a sluggish pace. As such, I’m looking to significantly cut down, and by all means eliminate, my alcoholic intake over the next few years. As my Brit preaches ad nauseam, “Every extra drink robs you of happiness the next day.” I’ll cheers to that.

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Happy New Years Eve = Not So Happy Morning

Looking forward to the rest of 2016, I’m taking note of how I feel more self-aware of my body than in previous years. As such, my goals for this year are to give my body the nutrients and self-care it needs, while also setting and reaching the new goals I want to put into place. One huge drawback to working in Canada during the winter is that I find it is typically too cold to run outside, however I’ve substituted my long running route in Spain for a membership to IAM Yoga and Wynn Fitness, both of which are located quite close to my office. Having a pre- or post-office workout gives a bit of a jump start to each day.

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Exercise Gives You Endorphins = Endorphins Make You Happy

I’ve swapped my carb-heavy Spanish breakfast of olive-oil on thick whole wheat bread for a super-charged “Green Smoothie” (complete with spinach, flax, mango, banana, dates and a splash of chlorophyll) to start my day. My lunch is now more than half pure vegetables, as is my dinner. As a perpetual vegetarian and sometimes vegan, I have the tendency to lean towards carbo-loading every meal. By planning my meals at least a day in advance (and including some fresh fruit for snacks) I eliminate the risk of becoming hangry or splurging on something sweet.

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Lean, Mean… Green?

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Cold Pressery in Mississauga, ON. Easily One Of The Best Places For Vegan Food!

In the next few months I will have to adjust yet again to living in a new country (!!!!) and being 100% accountable for my budget and lifestyle choices. I think getting accustomed to a regime where I incorporate healthy eating, consistent workouts and a full-time job will make the transition a bit easier. I hope to run my first half-marathon by the end of the year, and what better place to accomplish that feat than Europe?

Good luck & good workout.

AS

 

BODY: The Truth Behind the Gluten-Free Movement

glutenfree

 

I’ve been meaning to write this post ever since someone came up to me about a year ago at the grocery store where I was working and asked me, “What aisle is your gluten-free popcorn in?”

It’s time to shed a bit of light on the “gluten-free” diet fad. Before the last few years, the only people who were following a strict gluten-free diet fell into two categories; those suffering from Celiac disease, and those with a wheat allergy.

Celiac disease is a digestive ailment which causes the small intestine to halt the absorption of nutrients from food when gluten is ingested; as a result people who suffer from this infliction cannot properly digest the gluten protein found in wheat, rye and barley. Not only is gluten found in foods but it is often added to medicine, vitamins, supplements and beauty products. Approximately 1 in 133 people suffers from celiac disease – not exactly enough to justify the 450 million dollar gluten-free market that exists in North America today.

When a person who suffers celiac disease ingests gluten, the intestine essentially shuts down and refuses to absorb nutrients from food. As a result, malnourishment, anemia and osteoporosis are often possible with sufferers of this disease. There are also those who suffer from wheat allergy, which causes an anti-body response and sparks rashes, hives and sometimes anaphylaxis.

The current trend is sparking a sub-group of people who avoid gluten and can be categorized as people suffering from “non-celiac gluten sensitivity.” Unfortunately I feel the rise in declaring yourself gluten-free has been sparked from a lot of hype from celebrities and not a lot of fact – enter my Popcorn Princess anecdote.

cyrus

While I will not discredit those who are sensitive to gluten, most nutritionists will agree that even those who find themselves uncomfortable after eating certain wheat products can typically ingest one serving of gluten per day and feel fine. Most foods do not contain gluten: any food made from a grain (i.e. all forms of corn and rice), most dairy products as well as beans and legumes.

The only places you will find gluten lurking is in wheat products; cakes, cereals, pasta, couscous, bread, barley, malt, rye and beer. Any processed food may contain a wheat by-product or have come in contact with one while being manufactured. The simplest way to avoid any digestion upsets is to follow an unprocessed vegetarian diet… Although I may be biased.

Is gluten actually crap? In moderation, no. While many find themselves losing weight when adopting a gluten free diet it is most likely because they have cut out a heavy-carb food group (bread and pasta, for example) and have failed to substitute it with a healthy, gluten-free alternative. In this case, you may be losing weight, but you are ultimately depriving your body of the carbohydrates it needs to function. By the same token, any postive changes you see in regards to your health after cutting out gluten-laden products may be due to eliminating crappy foods that just so happen to contain gluten, i.e. anything heavily processed and laden with chemicals, fat, excess carbohydrates and not much else.

Over-eating anything will cause symptoms – instead of cutting out your baguette sandwich immediately, instead try reducing your gluten intake and see how you feel. If nothing else, do your research. Paying extra for gluten-free foods that are naturally gluten-free is ridiculous! Above all, my favourite health mantra is this – everything in moderation.

Namaste,

AS

 

For more information please visit:

http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/celiac/

http://healthydebate.ca/2014/07/topic/non-celiac-gluten-sensitivity

BODY: Chlorophyll

gogreen

It’s time to talk about my nutrition supplement du jour.

Since completing my über hippie soul-searching Euro-trip I’ve begun to focus on an all-natural lifestyle approach. As a result, I have started supplementing my diet with liquid chlorophyll.

Before I discovered the numerous health benefits it bestows upon humans, my only knowledge of chlorophyll was my rudimentary Grade 12 Bio class – chlorophyll is food for plants. As it turns out, we can reap numerous health benefits from ingesting chlorophyll on a daily basis!

The construction of chlorophyll is almost identical to the molecule hemoglobin, which our bodies need to build and transport red blood cells; as a result it helps transport oxygen throughout the body. The only difference between hemoglobin and chlorophyll boils down to the centre atom; within hemoglobin the centre atom is iron while in liquid chlorophyll the center atom is magnesium. Magnesium is excellent for the body as it helps deliver oxygen to cells, tissues, bones, nerves and muscles. Not only that – nearly the entire body (cardiovascular system, digestive system, nervous system, brain, muscles, kidneys, liver, hormone-secreting glands) requires magnesium for metabolic function!

Due to its structure chlorophyll is an excellent antioxidant aid. With high levels of Vitamin A, C and E chlorophyll has been shown to lower inflammation within the body while removing excess toxins and waste. Its ability to bind to heavy metals such as mercury gives it a strong healing power.

Digestive problems? Adding a tablespoon of chlorophyll to water, juice or a smoothie two times per day can help promote a healthy digestive tract. As a result, it also helps combat bad breath stemming from an unhealthy bloodstream or colon.

Personally I prefer liquid chlorophyll because I am guaranteed 150mg per serving and it’s easy to add to smoothies on a busy day. However, there are loads of foods you can add to your daily diet to start improving your health such as: asparagus, bell peppers, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green cabbage, celery, collard greens, green beans, green peas, kale, leeks, green olives, parsley, romaine lettuce, sea vegetables, spinach, Swiss chard, and turnip greens.*

Since incorporating more greens into my diet I’ve noticed my energy levels improving in the morning – an impressive feat considering I have substituted a green smoothie instead of coffee!

If you aren’t ready to commit to liquid chlorophyll (it costs $26 for 1L of liquid, which lasts about a month) then start adding fresh or steamed greens to your meals!

When in doubt, GO GREEN.

Namaste,

AS

 

 

*Read more at http://naturalrevolution.org/untapping-the-secrets-of-chlorophyll/#Mi70ACi8W8GuDpKc.99

 

SOL: Falafel & Wine

SOL: Falafel & Wine

Blew through my budget shockingly quickly while in Barcelona… I should have brought more cash with me! As it is my dinner funds were slightly strapped – thankfully we managed to find $3 falafel and $4 bottles of rose. Priorities!

Breakfast is included at Urbany Barcelona and then I have enough cash set aside for lunch on the street and some fresh fruit for the train back to Perpignan.

We walked around for five hours today exploring the city and getting a taste of Barcelona life. Tomorrow we’ll loop around the port and visit the Gothic district before getting on the 4pm train back to our host’s house.

It’s been a whirlwind trip so far, but it’s exciting and it reminds me why I love traveling.

Safe travels,
AS

SOL: Running in the Mountains and Sunday Roast

SOL: Running in the Mountains and Sunday Roast

Sunday was spent in a state of semi-relaxation. We managed to finish all the morning tasks fairly early on and then did some gardening until lunch.

Afterwards we drove to a local street market which is essentially a city-wide thrift store. Overall it was a bunch of random junk, but there were some cool old trunks and vintage furniture that would have been nice to buy. Alas, I only walked away with two new scarves.

Afterwards I sat by the pool and finished reading The Alchemist and then decided to go for a run. It’s so beautiful running here and I’m continuously stopping to look at the mountains and the view. Naturally I got lost and I’m fairly certain my legs will be dead tomorrow.

Sunday dinner is consistently modeled after a “Vegan Roast” and we ate garlic-roasted potatoes, pea soup, cauliflower, oat loaf, homemade bread and cake. Namua’s cooking is going to kill me; not to mention the pitcher of wine that we manage to go through every evening.

French living is truly in a league of its own.

AS

BODY: Grilled Avocado

BODY: Grilled Avocado

Have I mentioned my slight (read: all-consuming, literally) obsession with avocados?

I love them. I eat them daily, use them for face masks and hair masks, and would happily run away to live on an avocado farm for the rest of my life.

Aside from adding avocado to sandwiches and salads, last summer I discovered the mouth-watering appeal of the grilled avocado.

Easiest meal ever: half the avocado, remove the pit, place both halves in tin foil. Drizzle some coconut oil and add any seasoning you like. I add the Clubhouse Cajun mix, even though it’s full of sodium because it tastes So.Damn.Good.

Toss it in the oven (350 degrees) or on the BBQ for 10-15 until the top has browned and it’s sizzling.

I eat it out of the skin using multigrain crackers like Wheat Thins, but you can serve in with tortilla chips, pita, or whatever you like!

Some health benefits of avocado include:

Healthy Fats: While you might be tempted to shy away from avocados because they are high in fat, (three quarters of the calorie count), have no fear! Avocados contain monounsaturated fat which has been proven to reduce bad cholesterol and lower your risk of stroke & heart disease.

Vitamins & Minerals: Avocados contain Potassium, Vitamin K, Vitamin C, Vitamin E and B Vitamins to keep your inner and outer appearance healthy & glowing!

Dietary Fiber: Avocados contain approximately 11 grams of fiber, which is half of your daily quota.

Waist Not, Want Not: People who eat avocado on a regular basis have been shown to have a lower body weight, BMI and waist circumference than those who don’t.

Clean Body, Clean Mind: Avocados contain glutathione, a powerful antioxidant that helps fight free radicals in the body. It also boosts the immune system, prevents dementia, slows the aging process (!!!) and encourages a healthy nervous system.

F*ck Cancer: Avocados are rich in phytochemicals which have been reported to prevent certain cancers. The chemopreventative characteristics of avocados show that they offer a dietary advantage in the prevention of cancer.

Try it now!
Namaste,
AS